Book Reviews · Reading

Oscar and Lucinda Book Review

Book: Oscar and Lucinda by Peter Carey

#80 on the Telegraph’s 100 books everyone should read.

Grade: F

What is the story about?

I would like to say Oscar and Lucinda, but seeing that they only met page 270, not really convinced.

Verdict:

I usually average reading 2 novels a month, this took me around 4 months to finish. It was such a hard novel for me to finish as I didn’t feel any connection to it at all.

It was very confusing too. Each chapter is short, around 2 or 3 pages max; but each chapter has a different narrator or can jump between regions/time. It takes me awhile into a chapter to figure out what is actually going on or who/what I am reading about.

I almost feel bad for giving this book an F .. almost.

It shows that Mr. Carey tried his best, maybe he over tried. Mr. Carey himself says he was anxious while writing the novel. He says he “would take other books off the shelf to check my chapter length was ok.” Mr. Carey I am sorry to say that even though your chapter length was ok, your book length was not. The entire story could’ve been told in 100 pages or so, not 500.

The best way to describe what I feel about this is like watching an anxious cook who wants to get a Michelin star dish but ruins it by trying way too hard and overdoing it.

I can see that you tried, but i’m sorry to say Mr. Carey, you ruined your dish.

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Next book:

Wide Saragosa Sea by Jean Rhys.

Book Reviews · Reading

Mini Reviews: Books 90 – 81

Yay! I have officially finished 20 books from the Telegraph’s 100 greatest novels of all time!

I also achieved my Goodreads goal for the year so double yay!

Here is an overview and mini reviews of books 90 – 81 on the list (you can find the mini reviews of books 100 – 91 here.)

# 90: Under the Net by Iris Murdoch

Grade: D

Favorite Quote:

What prevented the closure of this mutually rewarding deal? My principles. Surely there must be some way around. In similar fixes I have rarely failed to find one.

Mini Review:

Well, the above quote says it all; an unprincipled story of a man who is a lazy, immoral, opportunistic bum. Was I entertained a bit? Maybe .. but nothing else really.

You can read the full review here.

# 89: The Golden Notebook by Doris Lessing

Grade: F

Favorite Quote:

There’s a great black mountain. It’s human stupidity. There are a group of people who push a boulder up the mountain. When they’ve got a few feet up, there’s a war, ot the wrong sort of revolution, and the boulder rolls down – not to the bottom, it always manages to end a few inches higher when it started.

Mini Review:

I don’t really know why they called it the golden notebook, it should’ve been the grey or black notebook as it was a huge book of darkness, depression and degeneration of society. I did not like or enjoy this book at all.

You can read the full review here.

# 88: Eugene Onegin by Alexander Pushkin

Grade: A

Favorite Quote:

But whom to love? To trust to treasure?

Who won’t betray us in the end?

And who’ll be kind enough to measure

Our words and deeds as we intend?

Who won’t sow slander all about us?

Who’ll coddle us and never doubt us?

To whom will all our faults be few?

Who’ll never bore us through and through?

You futile, searching phantom-breeader,

Why spend your efforts all in vain;

Just love yourself and ease the pain,

My most esteemed and honoured reader!

A worthy object! Never mind,

A truer love you’ll never find.

Mini Review:

I absolutely loved this book. It was a breath of fresh air after The Golden Notebook. It was witty and clever and very entertaining. Highly recommend it.

You can read the full review here.

# 87: On the Road by Jack Kerouac

Grade: F

Favorite Quote:

n/a

Mini Review:

The Telegraph says Kerouac wrote the book in “three near-sleepless weeks” and it clearly shows. It was like having a narrow minded, arrogant, frat boy showing off his conquests and going on and on about his endless partying, drinking, girls, and outings

You can read the full review here.

# 86: Old Man Goriot by Honore de Balzac

Grade: A-

Favorite Quote:

The more coldly calculating you are, the further you will go. Strike ruthlessly and you’ll be respected.

Mini Review:

I really enjoyed this classic cleverly depicting French high society and heart wrenchingly showing how money can sometimes be more important than everything, even one’s own parents.

You can read the full review here.

# 85: The Red and the Black by Stendhal

Grade: C

Favorite Quote:

I have loved truth .. Where is truth? .. Everywhere hypocrisy .. Man cannot put his trust in man.

Mini Review:

The book was OK, just OK. Felt like it was a wanna be Romeo and Juliet and I didn’t really like the characters much.

You can read the full review here.

# 84: The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas

Grade: A

Favorite Quote:

As a general rule .. people ask for advice only in order not to follow it; or if they do follow it, in order to have someone to blame for giving it.

Mini Review:

I absolutely loved this book! Might even be my favorite so far on this list.

You can read the full review here.

# 83: Germinal by Emile Zola

Grade: D

Favourite Quote:

Violence has never prospered, you can’t remake the world in a day. Anyone who promises to change everything for you all at once is either a fool or a rogue!

Mini Review:

A political manifesto, a failed attempt at a revolution, a realistic depiction of the horrible life of miners. I did not enjoy reading this book at all.

You can read the full review here.

# 82: The Stranger by Albert Camus

Grade: C

Favorite Quote:

After a while, you could get used to anything.

Mini Review:

I didn’t like it and I didnt hate it. A short awkward story devoid of emotions about a killing.

You can read the full review here.

#81: The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco

Grade: C

Favorite Quote:

Perhaps the mission of those who love mankind is to make people laugh at the truth, because the only truth lies in learning to free ourselves from insane passion for the truth.

Mini Review:

The book can be divided into two main themes: the murder mystery which I loved, and the theology conversations which I didn’t. But overall, i did enjoy the book and it does get better after the 200 page mark as the action picks up.

You can read the full review here.

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And there it is. The good, the bad, and the ugly. I have been pleasantly surprised by some and dissapoinyed by some.

Breaking it down, French authors have the lead; a nobel prize winner was a complete flop; two of my favorites are by Alexanders, and being on the road was not what i always dreamt it would be.

Looking forward to the next 10 on the list.

Till next time .. Happy reading ❤

Book Reviews · Reading

The Name of the Rose Book Review

Book: The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco

#81 on the Telegraph’s 100 novels everyone should read.

Grade: C

What is the story about?

The book is a journey to unravel the mystery behind the killings in an Italian monastery. Brother William and his understudy, Adso (the narrator of the story), take on this exciting task. It is a murder mystery along with numerous philosophical and theological banter.

Verdict?

It’s very hard and confusing for me to rate this book because I have two oppsite feelings about it. So I will divide it into two sections: the murder mystery part and the theology part.

Let’s start with the good. The murder mystery part I really enjoyed. I loved the reasoning behind Brother Williams deductions and how Eco planned it out. I also really liked the ending and how he wrapped it all together.

That being said, wow was this a tough book to plough through. I almost DNF and had to push myself through the first 100-200 pages (I enjoyed the 2nd half of the book much better).

Now i can’t really rate this part of the book or have an opinion about it really because i had no idea what he was talking about. I was reading words that i know, but had no idea what it was saying.

I am not a Christian, or a historian, or European. I have no idea who or what are the Fraticellis or Minirites or Benedicts. I have no prior knowledge or background to fall back on when reading these discussions so it was just words to me, without meaning.

And at the beginning of the novel, not much was happening regarding the murders and there was A LOT of discussions.

Which to me was like: wow this is so boring and slow and have no idea what is going on for 20-30 pages then yaay finally some action is happening .. then back to omg should i stick to this book really do i have to then yay something else happened.

But, even though they had looong discussions that i couldn’t really follow, I ended up liking both Brother William and Adso at the end.

**Spoiler**

And I liked what I took away from this book. Other than the history lesson, i liked that ‘laughter’ was the reason behind all the killings. It just shows you how important and powerful laughter really is.

I will leave you with a couple of quotes about laughter, and hope your days are filled with the joy and healing of it.

Book Reviews · Reading

Book Review: The Stranger by Albert Camus

Book: The Stranger by Albert Camus

#82 on the Telegraph’s 100 novels everyone should read.

Grade: C

What is the story about?

The story is about a French Algerian, Meursault, who finds himself committing a crime, shooting an Arab 5 times.

Verdict?

I didn’t love it and I didn’t hate it. After finishing the book, I don’t hold any strong feelings for the character or the story to be honest.

The book was a very short and quick read (123 pages). At first it was awkward a bit. Thought it might be from the translation but I think it’s deliberate to build up the characters awkward personality.

I don’t know why people are so bothered by his nonchalant character and lack of empathy. Honestly, maybe I just feel this way because I read much worse books on this list lol. But his attitude is real, it’s not overdone or made up. It’s real. It’s just the way the world is now (and I guess back when the book was written too).

What annoyed me the most is that there was no definite closure to the book. Was he executed or did he get his pardon? Most likely I think he got his pardon because that’s the way life is .. isn’t it? People are almost always pardoned when it’s a crime against a minority .. sad but very true.

I think the major debate and uproar about this book is Meursault’s lack of empathy or concern for his crime. Coming from a person who is over emotional about everything, I almost envy his thick skin. Of course not to the point of shooting a guy 5 times just because you’re bothered by the sun. But the thick skin that will make you resilient and can adapt to any situation thrown at you.

All in all, a short read that to me was just mediocre.


Next read:

The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco. The novel is set in a 14th century Italian monastery .. should be interesting.

Till next time ❤

Book Reviews · Reading

Germinal Book Review

Book: Germinal by Emile Zola

#83 on the Telegraph’s 100 novels everyone should read.

Grade: D

What is the story about?

The story follows Etienne, a newcomer to a mining village who quickly got frustrated by the poverty and degrading standard of living that he started a strike, in the hopes of triggering, germinating, a revolution.

Verdict?

I get it. I get why this book is considered an important piece of work but to be honest, I didn’t enjoy reading this book at all.

First of all, I don’t like politics. To me there is no right or wrong sides as it is all dirty business. Everyone is in it for themselves and their personal gains. It’s all about the money and power and what you can achieve for yourself at the expense of other people. So I think its a bunch of crap when a politician comes out and says he is fighting for the people. And my point is even proven in this book.

Etienne, who was supposed to fight for the people, felt above them because he was “educated” and they weren’t. He dreamed of glory and furthering his popularity for his personal gains. Then when what he wanted didn’t happen, he felt disgusted by his followers.

As he puts it, he calls them “wretched people” who makes him feel “repugnance and unease.” He even calls them “dumb animals” who are “primitive and lack intelligence.”  His selfishness is so annoying that when he goes down and checks the abandoned mines, every time he rejoices at a rock-fall I wished that a rock fall will crush him in.

The politics is all summed up by a ruthless but honest man in the book: “It’s all nonsense .. They’ll never get anywhere with that nonsense.”

So as you can see, I don’t really like politics.

And not just that. I love to read so I can have an hour or so after I put my four kids to sleep, in peace and quiet, and be transported into an imaginary world in literature.

I did not want to spend this quiet hour reading about a hopeless horse facing despair in his final second gasping for death before he died .. or about the starving death of a child .. or about the mutilation of a dead body.

If you want to read a political manifesto, a failed attempt of a revolution from comrades against bourgeoise, exploitation of all kind, a realistic depiction of the horrible life of miners .. then this book is for you.

If you are like me .. then I would skip it.


Next book: The Stranger by Albert Camus

Another book I know nothing about except that one of my Instagram followers said she did not enjoy it much, We’ll see how it goes.

Happy reading ❤

Book Reviews · Reading

The Three Musketeers Book Review

Book: The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas

#84 on the Telegraph’s 100 novels everyone should read.

Grade: A

What is it about?

The novel follows the adventures of D’Artagnan, a brave handsome young man, in his quest to be a musketeer. Although he couldn’t join the elite group at first, he quickly became best friends with the best musketeers out there: Amos, Porthos & Aramis (the 3 musketeers). D’Artagnan and the three musketeers then go on an unforgettable adventure.

Verdict?

This is by far the best and my most favorite book I read on this list, maybe even one of the best I read in years.

True, the book doesn’t hold profound insights or offer amazing discoveries .. but it does tell one heck of a story.

The novel is 600+ pages (my version was around 350 only because the book was big in size, as in textbook size) but you don’t even feel it. You don’t feel like it was slow at some parts or feel like there are fillers in the middle. It was like watching a movie unfold in your head while reading.

Also, I did not meet one character in this novel that I did not like. D’Artagnan is so relatable and lovable (unlike M. Julien Sorrel in the previous book I read.) You’re just rooting for him throughout the entire novel. And the three musketeers are simply amazing! Each one has a distinct character and are so well crafted by Dumas, almost felt like they were my best friends too.

I also like the villains in this story. The unwavering ambition of the Cardinal who will reach his goal at ay cost is so very real. As for Milady, savage as my son would say. I also loved that the strongest most intimidating villain in this novel was a lady. Ladies are usually drawn as petty, feeble, weak, and most times stupid. This woman on the other hand .. savage!

The only blah character in this novel was the King, which I believe was a subtle political statement of how kings are. Also making the reason of war between England and France a love affair is another strong political statement. What is war and thousands of deaths to the importance of a Duke’s love affair and a king’s pride?

15 books into this list and by far my favorite are French authors (and a Russian I have to add). Loved, loved this book! Can’t wait to get a hold of the movie and watch it with my husband, who by the way has a mustache and every time the musketeers twist theirs reminds me of him .. my own real life musketeer. ❤


Next book: Germinal by Emile Zola. Another French author. Yay can’t wait!

Book Reviews · Reading

The Red and the Black Book Review (#85)

Book: The Red and the Black by Stendhal

#85 on the Telegraph’s 100 novels everyone should read.

Grade: C

What is the story about?

The story follows Monsieur Julien Sorrel and his rise from obscurity, the son of a carpenter in the countryside, to fame in the posh Paris salons.

Verdict?

I really wanted to like this book .. but to be honest .. it’s just meh.

I left the book with an impression of reading a wana-be Romeo and Juliet but not quiet getting there.

In the end I felt like everyone was in love with Julien except for me. He actually annoys me for most of the book. He was too full of himself and thought the world revolves around him.

I also didn’t like the ladies in the book. Mme de Renal was a good wife and mother until Julien came along. Then it’s like she loses her mind and forgets everything she ever believes in when she gazes in his dreamy eyes.

As for Mlle Mathilda .. Oh my. She is a spoilt girl who enjoys getting things she can’t have .. but then loses interest as soon as she actually gets them.

The only character I liked was M. de la Mole, who was wronged by almost every character in the book.

If I have read this book back in my teens when I was a hopeless romantic .. maybe I would’ve liked the story more.

But for now .. it’s just meh.


Next book: The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas.

I used to call my sisters and I the three musketeers. will be nice to know their real story..

Till next time ❤